What’s A Time-Slip Novel?

The other day, when I was asked on Goodreads’ Ask An Author, “Where did you get the designation “time slip? I’ve not seen that before,” I was reminded that I hadn’t seen that term either before I published my debut novel, A CRY FROM THE DEEP

No, I didn’t know about time slip, only time travel. I’d read Diana Gabaldon’s novel, OUTLANDER, and in fact, an old movie—I’ll Never Forget Youabout a scientist who goes back in time and falls in love—inspired me to write my story.

Time SlipI first learned about time slip from David Burnett, of The Kindle Book Review. He had emailed me and told me he couldn’t find my book online to post his review.  He had received an e-book in advance of my publishing date, one of a number I had sent out on spec. (My plan was to have reviewers in place so that when my novel went on sale, the reading public would have some idea of what they were getting.)

I wrote David back, telling him that my book wasn’t published yet, but would be soon, and would he mind if I contacted him when it came out, so that he could post his review? At that point, I had no idea of what he might say, but my thinking was a review was better than no review. And those who are starting out with their debut novels know how important reviews are.

David replied, “You better let me know as I’m giving you a five star review.” Now, how wonderful is that?

When my book was published on Oct. 15, 2014, and David posted his review, I noted that he mentioned, “in a time slip novel”, etc. etc.  His term time slip both delighted and surprised me, as I hadn’t known there was such an entity.

Though a time travel story inspired my romantic mystery, I had used time in a different way. My protagonist, Catherine Fitzgerald, dips into the past for brief periods, in other words,  she slips in and out and out of time quickly and briefly, each time slip triggered by an image, a scene, or an object. How I  came up with that, I have no idea, but I do believe that Catherine had a say in it.

That is why I had such joy writing this story, as the characters spoke to me on occasion. And if you think that’s crazy, ask any writer. When you’re in the zone, the characters come to life and give direction. In fact, I had so much fun telling this tale, that I’ve now begun to write a time travel Y/A novel. I hope I can manage to finish this one, as it’s kind of personal.

For more on time slip, see Wikipedia.

Have you heard about time-slip stories before? And if so, can you recommend any? And thank you in advance for any comments. Always love to hear from readers.

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  1. Hello, I have known and used the term time slip for many years. I used to teach Children’s Literature and we did a unit on books with a time travel theme. I love to get lost in a time slip story! I am glad to have found your blog through the Thursday Favorites blog hop. Michele
    Michele recently posted…5 Reasons Why We Need CousinsMy Profile

    • Michelle, nice to meet you and thanks for your comment. I love time travel and yet had never heard the term, time slip. I’m so intrigued that I’ve started outlining another time travel story, this one a YA one. I hope I can keep up my enthusiasm. I’ll check out your blog, too.

  2. As a kid I remember watching The Langoliers on TV (a mini-series) from a book written by Stephen King. That movie has haunted me ever since I watched it. 🙂
    Marti
    Marti recently posted…Work In ProgressMy Profile

    • Marti, was that a time slip story? I’m not familiar with it, but not surprised that Stephen King wrote it. He wrote that time travel book, 11/22/63, about the John F. Kennedy assassination. You are right though, those kind of stories haunt us. They make us wonder what is possible, what went on before, and what will go on after we’re gone.